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Vaccine prevents HIV infection in women: study

Since its discovery in 1981, thousands of scientists have dedicated themselves to finding a cure for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). However, there is good news for the task of prevention.

A study led by Dr. Sinead Delany-Moretlwe showed that an experimental vaccine is capable of inhibiting the spread of HIV in women. The study was paused after learning that the vaccine was more effective than taking the daily pill of Truvada, a drug that helps prevent the spread of HIV through sexual intercourse.

An important and remarkable process

Doctor applying an injection to a person's arm

This study was conducted in seven African countries and involved 3,223 women between the ages of 18 and 45. In this continent, most women do not have access to contraceptive methods such as the male or female condom, so contracting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is more common than is believed. That is why for the United Nations (UN) it is important that citizens have access to medicines that help prevent these diseases.

A great scientific breakthrough

Gerinja with a red bow, indicating the fight against HIV

Previously, some women took Truvada pills as part of their treatment, but the research study found that cabotegravir injections are 89 percent more effective, requiring only one dose every eight weeks.

This is a very important advance. I don’t think we can stress enough the importance of this study.

-Anthony Fauci, Study Contributor

Despite the great achievements, the researchers assure that it is important to continue with the studies, since it is not advisable to rely only on one drug, but it is great to have one more option for the prevention of HIV.

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